PlayStation General
28 Oct 2014 03:51 PM
Supawiz6991
By: Supawiz6991

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IPv6, PSN and You: Clearing up the Confusion.

32 replies

So after scuttling the forums for IPv6 support for the PS4 (and other devices), I noticed that there was a lot of misconceptions and misinformation about IPv6, how it works and why you should care. My intention with this post is to try and clear up the confusion.

 

1. IPv6 just at the ISP level or in the home network?

 

A lot of folks are under the impression that IPv6 will only be at the ISP level and internal networks will continue to use IPv4.

 

In actuality, IPv6 will indeed be used on internal networks. Each IP enabled device will be given a Public IPv6 address from the ISP.  This public IPv6 address usually wont change. Thats where Privacy Extensions come in. All major operating systems include privacy extensions. The Privacy Extensions allow you to have a temporary IPv6 address so that your static address is not seen. It is unknown at this time if Sony will include Privacy Extensions in the PS4.

 

More Indepth Answer (For those interested on how IPv6 addresses are assigned)(Credit:): Your ISP will give your router an address prefix (typically either a /64 or a /48), and your router will allow systems to configure themselves with the address they see fit.  This is how the privacy extensions work..

 

Privacy Extensions can be disabled, however unless you are doing something like hosting a website on a box in your house you have no reason to do that.

 

2. But what about IPv4?

 

Until IPv4 is completely migrated out, IPv4 and IPv6 will run at the same time. This is called Dual Stack.

 

3. What about NAT?

 

NAT is used in IPv4 to give you the ability to have multiple machines behind one IP address. Your router has to take the traffic from an internal address, remember where it came from and then send the data out using your ISP issued address instead of your internal address. The reverse happens for inbound traffic.

 

NAT occurs in your Router and some ISPs have implemented CGNAT or Carrier Grade NAT

 

CGNAT is your ISP's way of dealing with the shortage of IPv4 but can lead to problems for end users.

 

How so? well, as I said before, NAT allows you to put multiple internal IP's behind one public IP. If one user gets banned from PSN for hacking (Banned by IP), guess what? Yep, everyone behind that IP is banned.

 

NAT or Network Address Translation is not needed with IPv6 because every machine has its own unique public address. This means you wont have to worry about making sure you have the correct NAT type to play games. As an added bonus, because all your machines get their own public IP and because there's no CGNAT, you don't have to worry about getting banned because of someone elses behavior.

 

4. Will I see a huge improvement in my connection quality, ping times, ect...?

 

Possibly. If you previously had NAT type issues due to router or ISP settings then yes, you will notice an improvement as IPv6 doesn't use NAT.

 

Connection Quality, ping times and Speeds are dependant on your service package and the quality of your ISP's service and the server your connecting to.

 

More Indepth Answer (Credit: Yaz): In the long term, IPv6 users may see some marginal improvements in latency, as packet routing in IPv6 is simpler than in IPv4.  Every routing layer you pass through (including your local NAT layer) adds to latency as routing decisions have to be made; reducing the computation at each layer can have a measurable effect on latency, somewhat improving ping times.  Don't expect it to be some massive increase -- but you can probably expect to shave a few percent off the average case.

 

5. In terms of the PS4 why is IPv6 important 'to you'? - (Source)

 

Good question! For most folks it would be the freedom from Nat. Many people suffer from their Nat type issues which causes trouble playing games.

 

The Freedom from CGNAT also means I/we wont get banned because of someone hacking/cheating/ect.

 

6. What about security with IPv6? Am I not exposed to the world?

 

No you are not exposed. Yes, every machine is given its own IPv6 address but major operating systems such as Windows, Mac and Linux distros have built in firewalls.

 

Additionally, routers will be able to firewall IPv6 traffic once they are updated to do so (Check the manufactures website for updated firmware). IPv6 firewalling is separate from IPv4 firewalling and thus will have a separate interface in your routers GUI.

 

I don't know if Sony plans to incorporate any kind of back end firewall in the PS4 (I would expect they would). I've kept my Playstations in the DMZ for years and haven't had an issue nor have I heard of anyone's systems being hacked into.

 

7. Is IPv6 adoption optional?

 

No. Can you put it off a while? Sure. The fact of the matter is, IPv4 is being phased out. and that  means you will eventually have to adopt IPv6 or lose the abillity to use the internet.

 

Same goes for Sony, the PS4, Vita and PSN. They MUST adopt IPv6 or they will become unusable when IPv4 is completely phased out..

 

8. When will IPv4 be completely phased out?

 

That is currently unknown. It is expected to be atleast a few years out.. Currently, those who support IPv6 do so in a Dual Stack environment (They run IPV6 & IPv4 at the same time). Time Warner Cable and Comcast have both have taken the initive and have rolled out IPv6 support to the majority of their networks(It has been learned that at the time of this writing TWC does not yet have IPv6 DNS servers. This results in laggy/delayed IPv6 connections. Its recommended that you use Google or another IPv6 DNS server until TWC gets their own setup).

 

More Indepth Answer (Credit: ): I wouldn't bet on IPv4 being phased out for at least another 10 years.  While most of the Regional Internet Registries have run out of new IPv4 addresses to assign (everyone except AFRINIC at this point), nobody has much incentive to stop using IPv4.  All too few consumers are ready to adopt IPv6, and too many ISPs have little incentive to push their customers to IPv6 (and many of the big ones have giant pools of IPv4 address space still available to give out to new customers).

 

9. What do I need to do to get IPv6?

 

There is a couple of things you need have in place in order to receive it.

 

First, your ISP has to offer IPv6. You can find out if they do by calling them.

Second, Your Modem has to support IPv6. If you have an ISP issued modem then ask them if it supports at the same time you call them to see if they are offering IPv6.

Third, Your Router needs to support it. If your router doesn't currently support it, check for firmware updates on the manufactures website as they sometimes add in the support via an update. If  you have ISP issued equipment then you will need to check with your ISP.

Fourth, Your devices must support it. Windows Vista and later support IPv6. Newer Mac and Linux Distro's also support IPv6.

 

To test if you already have IPv6 or to see if its working click here -> http://ipv6-test.com/

 

Additional Information on the topic(This applies to your internal home network only. You would still need ISP level IPV6 support to connect to game servers via IPv6. Correction: you CAN  use IPv6 Tunneling to connect to the greater interwebs.) (Credit: ): Your ISP doesn't need to offer IPv6 in order to start using it.  There are a variety of services which provided 6-to-4 tunneling services, such as HE.net.  Combined with a suitable router (all of Apple's routers are IPv6 enabled out of the box, for example), one can pretty quickly and easily IPv6-enable their entire network today, even without ISP support.  Naturally from a performance perspective ISP support is best (and some ISPs have taken half-steps towards IPv6 support by providing their own 6to4 servers for customers to use).

 

I can confirm that in the United States Comcast, Time Warner Cable and a bunch of other hosts are supporting IPv6. That being said, I can confirm that TWC does not have actual IPv6 DNS servers yet (they are using their IPv4 servers to handle IPv6 dns requests) thus I recommend using Googles IPv6 DNS servers or Trusted IPv6 DNS servers of your choice.

 

10. Once Sony Enables IPv6 support in their network each game developer will have to enable IPv6 support in their games and servers. I would like to think that anything on the PS4 would already have that functionallity built in and waiting to be used..however theres no guarentee that it is, which means once Sony enables support we will have to wait for game developers to then enable support for it.

 

I hope I've helped to clear up some of the confusion regarding IPv6. As I said before I was seeing a lot of mis-information on the forums (Even from someone who is tagged "Mvp Support") and wanted to try and clear some of it up.

 

**UPDATE:  It now appears that the PS4 has basic IPv6 support. The PS4 does obtain a IPv6 address but at this point it appears as though its not usable. Tests through http://ipv6-test.com fails. Putting an ipv6 address in the ps4 web browser results in a "not supported" error. https://ipv6.google.com also fails with a not supported. Lastely I tried the IPv6 of my linux server on my home network and that failed as well. **UPDATE: The IPv6 address does respond to pings. IPv6 DNS Support still doesn't exist.

 

All tests indicate that even though the ps4 obtains an IPv6 address, it is not usable. While its dissappointing that its not usable it is a good sign that basic support is there.

 

I submitted an Idea through the Playstation.Blog.Share to help push for IPv6 Support. Go here and upvote and comment on it to help the push!

 

In conclusion, IPv6 support has benefits to gamers of all kinds. Bringing IPv6 support to PS4 is essential.

Update: As of firmware update 5.50 (Dropped today, 3/5/18), PS4 still does not have IPv6 support.

Update 2: Though this post is approaching four years old, I still monitor it for your questions and updated it with the latest news on IPv6 support for PS4.

Update 3: Firmware 6.00 is in beta. I'm currently testing it out but it does not include IPv6 support. Sony has said that there is no major changes that will be present in the beta version of this firmware. I will update once the firmware leaves beta and goes live.

If anyone has any further questions, please post below and I'll do my best to answer them.

 

As of 10/30/16 Sony, PSN/SEN do not yet have IPv6 support and the PS4 has only basic IPv6 support (IPv6 is not usuable though)!

Author Edit (8/1/18) FW 6.00 Beta

Author Edit (3/8/18) Post FW 5.50 update.

Author Edit (10/13/17) As of PS4 update 5.00 no offical IPv6 support has been added.

Author Edit (6/3/17) Added more info about PS4 IPv6 support.

Author Edit (10/30/16)  New information on PS4 IPv6 support 

Author Edit (1/6/16): Corrected a mistake pertaining to IPv6 Tunneling being for internal network use only. Also, Happy New Year!

Author Edit (11/18/15): Added more indepth technical answers to a few questions. (Thanks to for providing those!)

Author Edit (11/17/15): Added link to Idea listing at Playstation.Blog.Share. Also Added blurb about game developers enabling IPv6 support.

Author Edit (5/3/15): Updated Post to reflect Privacy Controls, TWC IPv6 DNS Issues, Misc Fixes.

Author Edit:: Updated  post to reflect updated information on IPv6 Firewalling in routers. 

 Mod Edit: Updated label. Please click here  to learn more about labels. -Super_Nova2k13

 

 

 

  • So as of the 17/11/2016
    I still have nat issues as in my household there are 3 consoles
    Myself and my wife and our son I have tried port triggering and forwarding and DMZ and still only one console will give nat type open
    I need this IPv6 to fix my issues
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  • That's the kind of thing that will be a thing of the past once Sony adds IPv6 Functionality. Unfortunately Sony hasnt made any announcements on the topic. Its not a matter of IF they will support it but a matter of when.

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  • Just wanted to offer a few minor corrections and clarifications to an otherwise informative post:

     

    • Each IP enabled device on your network will not be given an address by your ISP.  Instead, your ISP will give your router an address prefix (typically either a /64 or a /48), and your router will allow systems to configure themselves with the address they see fit.  This is how the privacy extensions work.
    • In the long term, IPv6 users may see some marginal improvements in latency, as packet routing in IPv6 is simpler than in IPv4.  Every routing layer you pass through (including your local NAT layer) adds to latency as routing decisions have to be made; reducing the computation at each layer can have a measurable effect on latency, somewhat improving ping times.  Don't expect it to be some massive increase -- but you can probably expect to shave a few percent off the average case.
    • I wouldn't bet on IPv4 being phased out for at least another 10 years.  While most of the Regional Internet Registries have run out of new IPv4 addresses to assign (everyone except AFRINIC at this point), nobody has much incentive to stop using IPv4.  All too few consumers are ready to adopt IPv6, and too many ISPs have little incentive to push their customers to IPv6 (and many of the big ones have giant pools of IPv4 address space still available to give out to new customers).
    • Your ISP doesn't need to offer IPv6 in order to start using it.  There are a variety of services which provided 6-to-4 tunneling services, such as HE.net.  Combined with a suitable router (all of Apple's routers are IPv6 enabled out of the box, for example), one can pretty quickly and easily IPv6-enable their entire network today, even without ISP support.  Naturally from a performance perspective ISP support is best (and some ISPs have taken half-steps towards IPv6 support by providing their own 6to4 servers for customers to use).

    Yaz.

     

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  • Thanks for the Additional and indepth info! I was trying to keep it simple and easy to understand....however....after reading your post I decided that it would be a good idea to include that.

     

    I used your info directly and as such credited you accordingly! :smileyhappy:

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  • Aout MTU size. Ipv6 looks that we have to add 48 to our MTU size but ipv4 need just 28. How big is header for psn network if im currently on ipv6 and if my MTU is l 1452- should I add 28 to this number (1452) or should I add 48 for it. Please answerm me, cos my modem vigor130 support ipv6 and ip fragmentation and my router netgear WNDR 4500v2 support ipv6 and ip fragmentation so i can setup all devices - but I'm not sure is this 1480 or 1500 for psn network, when we setup an MTU size in network options in PS4. Thank You very much for answer. 

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  • PSN doesn't support IPv6 yet...so at this point you don't have to worry about MTU settings for IPv6.

     

    In regards to IPv4.. you shouldnt have to change this off of auto.

     

    I remember vaugly back in the day (perhaps PS2) having to changes this for a nat issue perhaps....but with a PS3 or PS4 is should not need to be changed. If it does then something is up with your router.

     

    The maximum MTU is 1500 and is also the recommended MTU size. You can reduce it, however, it is not recommended that you go below 1400.

     

    https://www.reddit.com/r/PS4/comments/2qo489/ok_rps4_lets_talk_mtu_max_transmission_unit_to/

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  • One further small correction to section 9, particularly the bit credited to me.  Running a 6to4 tunnel at the router level doesn't just give you a local in-home only IPv6 connection.  It does in fact give you a publically routable IPv6 address block (generally a /48), and you can use it to connect to the greater IPv6 enabled Internet.

     

    The way it works is that if you don't have a real IPv6 connection to your ISP, you can instead route IPv6 packets inside IPv4 packets (which can be routed by your ISP) to a service which discards the IPv4 packet headers and routes the encapsulated IPv6 packets on the public IPv6 internet on your behalf (and likewise doing the reverse for incoming packets).  Thus, while you may not have a native IPv6 connection with your ISP, you can still get on the IPv6 network via a tunnel broker.  When this is handled at the home router layer, the computers (or gaming consoles...) you attach to your network won't even be aware of the tunneling -- they get assigned a real IPv6 address, just as if your ISP did have suitable support.  The systems attached can't tell the difference, as the tunnelling occurs at the home router.  I know that Dlink and Linksys routers can do this using third-party firmware (such as OpenWRT); I know from experience that all of Apple's Airport routers from the last 8 years or so have built-in support for IPv6 tunnelling.

     

    Yaz.

     

     

     

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  • You are correct sir! I knew that too. I must have been brain dead or something the day I wrote that. Made the necessary correction above!

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  • You're thinking about MTU all wrong.  MTU only matters at your local interface, and within your home network.  While the maximum standard datagram size on ethernet is 1500 octets, you don't have any way to know what the MTU is of the various links between you and any other host on the Internet.  As such, any intermediary link may have a different MTU, and may fragment your packets.

     

    IPv6 supports jumbograms up to 4GiB-1b, however unless your layer 2 links between hosts support such a size (and so far, none do -- the max is around 9k for jumbograms), they're going to get broken into smaller packets anyway.

     

    Set your MTU to 1500 and forget about it.

     

    Yaz.

     

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  • themumu

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    YaztromoX wrote:

    You're thinking about MTU all wrong.  MTU only matters at your local interface, and within your home network.  While the maximum standard datagram size on ethernet is 1500 octets, you don't have any way to know what the MTU is of the various links between you and any other host on the Internet.  As such, any intermediary link may have a different MTU, and may fragment your packets.


    This is not entirely accurate. Some ISPs (e.g. AT&T in the US) are provisioning IPv6 through a tunneling technology called 6RD. This generally means that the MTU between your home gateway and the IPv6 internet is 1480. This is in turn is a fact the home gateway will likely inform hosts on the home LAN about, by including the MTU option in its IPv6 Router Advertisements. This is helpful for performance, because it allows applications on the hosts to have advance knowledge of what the maximum packet size that will work is (in particular by advertising a TCP MSS value of 1432). That way, Path MTU Discovery will not be required.
    Second, in IPv6, routers never fragment packets. Fragmentation happens only by the end nodes. Thus, if an IPV6 packet encounters an intermediary link whose MTU is too small, the router attached to that link will drop the packet and send an ICMPv6 message back to the original sender informing it about the MTU size of the link. It is then up to the original sender to re-transmit the data in smaller chunks.

     

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  • I have IPV6 at my home; my ISP is Time Warner Cable.

     

    I have an IPV6 enabled wireless router :  the linksys WRT 1200AC.

     

    Yesterday I was checking my Linksys settings through its web interface, and I noticed that my playstation was getting an IPV6 address.  I did some checking and indeed, this IPV6 address was alive and it was pointing to my PS4.

     

    I'm pretty sure that the router will only give out an IPV6 address to devices that "ask" for it.  Nowhere in the PS4 settings is IPV6 even mentioned.

     

    So, it would seem that Sony is quietly adding IPV6 support, even though it is not readily visible, yet.

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  • After some more experimentation, it seems that the PS4 is getting a different IPV6 address from time to time.  This indicates that the PS4 is using what in Windows is called a "temporary IPv6 address".

     

    It is possible that the PS4 also is getting a more permanent IPv6 address, but I don't know how to discover what it is.

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  • phantomdeejay wrote:

    It is possible that the PS4 also is getting a more permanent IPv6 address, but I don't know how to discover what it is.


    Here's something to try.  If you know the IPv6 address of all the other nodes on your network, you may be able to figure it out by doing a multicast ping, recording the addresses of all the nodes that respond, and then via a process of elimination determine which one is (hopefully) the PS4.

     

    I don't know if this works on Windows, but on a *NIX system, you can run:

     

    ping6 -c 3 ff02::1%eth0

    This will send out a multicast ping on IPv6 (on OS X, you'll need to use %en0 at the end of that command, replacing everything after the % with the network interface on your system you want to ping from).  All IPv6 nodes that are configured to respond to ICMPv6 requests should respond, and you'll see a list of addresses.  In my testing, the responses come from the link-local addresses (starting with fe80::), however the lower 64 bits appear to be identical to those of their global addresses (so you just need to transpose the upper 64 bits from fe80:: to your global IPv6 prefix to get the global IPv6 address for each node).

     

    I'm going to experiment with this myself, but as I have a dozen IPv6 enabled devices on my network (and over 20 devices total), and not all of them have a UI for me to interrogate their IPv6 addresses, it's going to take a while for me to narrow things down.  I'll report back if I can confirm that my PS4 has a global (or even just a link-local) IPv6 address.

     

    (FWIW, I did try an IPv6-only website throught he PS4 browser, with no luck).

     

    Yaz.

     

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  • phantomdeejay wrote:

    After some more experimentation, it seems that the PS4 is getting a different IPV6 address from time to time.  This indicates that the PS4 is using what in Windows is called a "temporary IPv6 address".

     

    It is possible that the PS4 also is getting a more permanent IPv6 address, but I don't know how to discover what it is.


    Okay -- addendum to my previous post.  I've figured out how to use ping6 to ping the multicast address and get global IPv6 responses.  Try the following (it's possible this will only work from Linux ping6):

    ping6 -B -I  -I  ff02::1

    That gave me ten results, nine of which I can identify.  Doing the multicast ping for link-local addresses resulted in eleven results (one of which I can identify as the PS4, as th link-local address is encoded as per the RFC from the MAC address), so I'm not sure if the unknown one is the PS4, or the other unknown system.  None of the bits match, so it seems that a temporary address is being used (as it should).  I'll probably have to resort to doing some port scans to see if I can match things up with the PS4.

     

    Yaz.

     

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  • OK.  Some good information here, thanks, Yaz.

     

    I was able to find my PS4's IPv6 address in Windows 7 by running a Wireshark capture while doing a

     

    ping -6 -S [my computer's perm. ipv6 address] FF02::1

     

    The onscreen results of the ping come up empty, but wireshark captures the information and I can comb through it to discover the IPv6 addresses being assigned to my PS4's MAC address.  It is a global unicast address, and it is the same one that my router configuration page displays.

     

    I can also do the same thing but more simply

     

    ping -6 FF02::1

     

     

    and the wireshark results will give the link-local addresses of the devices on my network.  I found my PS4 in that list as well.  It was easy to pick out because the link-local IP address is directly based on the PS4 MAC address.

     

     

    PS4 link local address discovered:  FE80 :: 2D9 : D1FF : FE9F : 7ECE
    
    PS4 MAC address:                         00 : D9 : D1 : 9F : 7E : CE

     

     

    I figured out why windows does not show any results in the command prompt window... its the firewall.   If I turn off windows firewall, i will get this line 4 times:

     

    Reply from ff02::1: time<1ms

     

     

    But I would still need to use wireshark to see the actual addresses.

     

    So, the PS4 is definitely getting IPv6 addreses, both global unicast and link-local.

     

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  • Hello suport of Sony - Playstantion , Please we brazililian players need the ps4 suport ipv6 like Microsoft, because a lot of company of telecom dont give suport to dual ip.... Please i want play again in my playstation......
    #PSSUPORTIPV6 ? #IPV6FORALL

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  • I know it has been a few months but I wanted to update this thread for anyone else that ends up here researching this issue like I did. I currently switched to Verizon LTE at home which has full IPv6 support. Before I did this, whenever doing a speedtest on my last provider from the PS4 network settings it would complain about my router not supporting packet fragmentation properly. I would randomly get kicked from games like Destiny a couple times an hour even with port forwarding configured properly (type 2 nat).

     

    My PS4 now gets an IPv6 address and passes traffic on it. Whenever I do a speedtest the PS4 no longer complains about lack of packet fragmentation support. I also no longer get kicked out of Destiny, aside from once when they were doing server maintenance. To experiment, I disabled IPv6 on my router and power cycled the PS4 to where it only had an IPv4 address. After doing so and running the test, it yet again complained about lack of packet fragmentation support. As soon as I renabled IPv6 and the PS4 regained an IPv6 address, all tests were perfect again.

     

    So at some point, there is indeed PSN IPv6 support now (at least in the US) and it does seem to eliminate any issues I had with NAT. Very noticeable difference. I've had flawless green bars in Destiny for a week now.

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  • Emerald_Swords (Support MVP)

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    CrankyCaleb wrote:

     

    I know it has been a few months but I wanted to update this thread for anyone else that ends up here researching this issue like I did. I currently switched to Verizon LTE at home which has full IPv6 support. Before I did this, whenever doing a speedtest on my last provider from the PS4 network settings it would complain about my router not supporting packet fragmentation properly. I would randomly get kicked from games like Destiny a couple times an hour even with port forwarding configured properly (type 2 nat).

     

    My PS4 now gets an IPv6 address and passes traffic on it. Whenever I do a speedtest the PS4 no longer complains about lack of packet fragmentation support. I also no longer get kicked out of Destiny, aside from once when they were doing server maintenance. To experiment, I disabled IPv6 on my router and power cycled the PS4 to where it only had an IPv4 address. After doing so and running the test, it yet again complained about lack of packet fragmentation support. As soon as I renabled IPv6 and the PS4 regained an IPv6 address, all tests were perfect again.

     

    So at some point, there is indeed PSN IPv6 support now (at least in the US) and it does seem to eliminate any issues I had with NAT. Very noticeable difference. I've had flawless green bars in Destiny for a week now.

     



    Very interesting, thanks for reporting.

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  • GraphiteGB (Support MVP)

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    Emerald_Swords wrote:

    CrankyCaleb wrote:

     

    I know it has been a few months but I wanted to update this thread for anyone else that ends up here researching this issue like I did. I currently switched to Verizon LTE at home which has full IPv6 support. Before I did this, whenever doing a speedtest on my last provider from the PS4 network settings it would complain about my router not supporting packet fragmentation properly. I would randomly get kicked from games like Destiny a couple times an hour even with port forwarding configured properly (type 2 nat).

     

    My PS4 now gets an IPv6 address and passes traffic on it. Whenever I do a speedtest the PS4 no longer complains about lack of packet fragmentation support. I also no longer get kicked out of Destiny, aside from once when they were doing server maintenance. To experiment, I disabled IPv6 on my router and power cycled the PS4 to where it only had an IPv4 address. After doing so and running the test, it yet again complained about lack of packet fragmentation support. As soon as I renabled IPv6 and the PS4 regained an IPv6 address, all tests were perfect again.

     

    So at some point, there is indeed PSN IPv6 support now (at least in the US) and it does seem to eliminate any issues I had with NAT. Very noticeable difference. I've had flawless green bars in Destiny for a week now.

     



    Very interesting, thanks for reporting.


    Yep interesting as lack of packet fragmentation support was just normaly fixed by lowering the MTU... as the ISP  services were normaly screwing up...

    But nice to see LTE may fix it any way...

     

     

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  • Routers dont fragment IPv6 traffic. My guess is that your router through your previous ISP was nerfed or your previous ISP has a misconfiguration and when you switched to verizon you thus got a different router that is working properly and/or proper configuration.

     

    As for PS4's getting an IPv6 address; I've heard that from few people but theres two things I want to point out. A. IF PS4's are managing to get an  IPv6 address (I have run some tests to check for that and have not found that to be the case) they are not being used for games yet. Further, if PS4's are getting IPv6 addresses I dont believe they are usable at all at this point as the PS4 firmware doesnt support it. B. I haven't been able to reproduce and/or verify the findings that PS4's are being assigned IPv6 address.

     

    Out of curosity, did you run any tests to check to see if your PS4 has an IPv6 address or is it an assumption based on the fact that your ISP supports IPv6? Its important to note that just because they support it doesnt mean that your PS4 is getting it ...the ps4 has to support it to get it and all evidence at this point show that the PS4 firmware doesnt support IPv6. The Network Interface Card in all likellyhood supports IPv6, but  without a firmware update that enables the PS4 to handle IPv6 traffic, IPv6 is essentially useless.

     

    Again, I've seen a few people claim that their PS4's are getting IPv6 and some have even provided the testing steps they used to make their determination....however I've not be able to reproduce their results (my PS4 isn't getting an IPv6 address) despite my home network having a fully operational IPv6 setup (ISP hands me a prefix and the devices generate the rest of the address per the IPv6 standard).

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Not sure when it happened, but I just noticed my PS4 getting an IPV6 address.  This had to be recently between 2-16 and now since that's the last time I paid attention to the IPV6 list on my router.  It doesn't show the IPV6 address off the PS4's network menu, nor does visiting ipv6.google.com off the PS4 Internet Browser work.  I will have to try and see if putting an IPV6 adress off the PS4's Internal Browser works.  That'll be fun trying to enter that.  Also this was connected via Ethernet cable I'll test WLAN as well later.

     

    To help others.  My IPV6 setup is native, stateless autoconfiguration.  There are intermediatary IPV6 support such as DHCP6, 6rd tunneling.  Perhaps it's those that the PS4 doesn't support.  However you wouldn't want IPV6 tunneling anyways and if that's all you are left with to make IPV6 work, then just turn it off until native, stateless is available.

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  • deztructo wrote:

    Not sure when it happened, but I just noticed my PS4 getting an IPV6 address. 


    I seem to have found definitive proof that the PS4 can get an IPv6 address (at least in firmware 4.0).

     

    While watching Netflix today, Netflix ran into a problem connecting to the server, and I wound up in the "Get Help" section.  There, under the Network tab, it is showing both the PS4's IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.

     

    PS4 IPv6.jpeg

     

    (Sorry for the bad cropping; I don't want to publicly advertise my PS4's IPv6 address, but as you can see it's the bit that starts with "2001:4").

     

    So there you go.  We now have a way to verify if a PS4 is indeed getting an IPv6 address, and to determine what that address is.  You can get here manually by running Netflix -> Settings -> Get Help -> Network.

     

    I hope everyone finds this helpful!

     

    Yaz.

     

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  • GraphiteGB (Support MVP)

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    YaztromoX wrote:

    deztructo wrote:

    Not sure when it happened, but I just noticed my PS4 getting an IPV6 address. 


    I seem to have found definitive proof that the PS4 can get an IPv6 address (at least in firmware 4.0).

     

    While watching Netflix today, Netflix ran into a problem connecting to the server, and I wound up in the "Get Help" section.  There, under the Network tab, it is showing both the PS4's IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.

     

    PS4 IPv6.jpeg

     

    (Sorry for the bad cropping; I don't want to publicly advertise my PS4's IPv6 address, but as you can see it's the bit that starts with "2001:4").

     

    So there you go.  We now have a way to verify if a PS4 is indeed getting an IPv6 address, and to determine what that address is.  You can get here manually by running Netflix -> Settings -> Get Help -> Network.

     

    I hope everyone finds this helpful!

     

    Yaz.

     


     

    Netflix is showing the IPV6 address of your Router NOT the PS4... the local IPV4 address of the devices was still listed first... 

    IPV4 conversion to IPV6 still uses the ROUTERs IPV6 address for all communication with IPV6 servers...

    The Routers IPV6 address is used for all devices IPV4 addresses... it then again converts to IPV4 after in the router to each device for incoming data...

     

    IPV6 is harder to geo hide so helps netflix block VPNs  and DNS proxy usage of any service you may be running, if they enable IPV6 servers the original Geo location will still show when they run there Geolocation check mid stream for your supplied IPV6 address...

     

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  • GraphiteGB wrote:

    Netflix is showing the IPV6 address of your Router NOT the PS4... the local IPV4 address of the devices was still listed first... 

    IPV4 conversion to IPV6 still uses the ROUTERs IPV6 address for all communication with IPV6 servers...

    The Routers IPV6 address is used for all devices IPV4 addresses... it then again converts to IPV4 after in the router to each device for incoming data...

     

    IPV6 is harder to geo hide so helps netflix block VPNs  and DNS proxy usage of any service you may be running, if they enable IPV6 servers the original Geo location will still show when they run there Geolocation check mid stream for your supplied IPV6 address...

     


    I hope you were either drunk or high when you wrote that, because it's the biggest piece of BS I've read all day.  It's pretty obvious you have no idea what you're talking about.

     

    There's a pretty easy way to show it's BS as well.  All I have to do is compare the IPv6 address Netflix on the PS4 is reporting, versus that of my IPv6 router.  And quite simply, they don't match.  It's not even close.  And no, my router isn't using temporary addressing (doing that doesn't make sense on a router, only on hosts).

     

    (No, I'm not sharing my public IPv6 address here, any more than I'd share my public IPv4 address).

     

    And FWIW, IPv6 is trivial to geo-hide.  I do it every day.

     

    It doesn't even make any sense when you state that "the local IPV4 address of the devices was still listed first".  I run a dual-stacked network.  All devices that request it can get both an IPv4 and an IPv6 address.  You have to display them in some order, and it's pretty standard to list the IPv4 address first.  That's not some magical indicator that all of the other rubbish you invented has any bearing on the truth.

     

    Oh, and FYI, routers don't typically advertise their IPv6 address over IPv4 -- there would be no point.  Routers generally advertise themselves via autoconf over IPv6; if the PS4 didn't have an IPv6 address and connection to the router, there would be no way for it to get the routers IPv6 address in the first place.

     

    There was not a single statement in your post that is reflective of the truth.  And I say that as someone who a) has a M.Sc. in Computer Science, b) has read all of the relevent RFC's, and c) has taught the subject at a major university.

     

    Yaz.

     

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  •  I think  misspoke. I think he was suggesting was that IPv4 to IPv6 tunneling was occuring. While IPv4 to IPv6 tunneling is an actual thing, It doesnt appear to be whats occuring.

     

    So I followed the same steps as  and Netflix is showing an IPv6 address for my PS4. I was able to ping said address from another computer on my network and got a response. Additionally, netflix doesnt show that any IPv6 dns servers are set.

     

    I set alternate IPv6 dns servers in my router as (at last check) TWC doesn't have full IPv6 dns servers yet (I'm told they send IPv6 DNS requests to their IPv4 servers using tunneling) but the PS4 doesn't seem to have those.

     

    Usage of the IPv6 address seems to be limited. Netflix shows the address but it is unclear if its using it. A test at http://ipv6-test.com fails and doesn't show IPv6 support.

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